More “Whatever it Takes” Quislings

Leslie Malkoff was headed to Dallas with her husband Kurt. Malkoff said she thinks people are missing the whole point of the scanners.
“You know what, everybody is so afraid, more afraid of being felt up than blown up. You know what, whatever it takes, I say, not to have someone take a bomb in their underwear. Whatever. So you’re fine with either one? I’m fine with either one. Oh, yeah. What do you think, honey? I totally agree,” Malkoff said.

(PublicBroadcasting.net.)

Barbara Carnes of Spokane was heading to Seattle for the holiday. She had no concerns about the heightened security measures or the body scanner. “Whatever it takes to be safe,” she said. “I don’t care.”

(Spokesman.com)

When all of you opt out and create long delays and missed flights how many will be the first to complain. How soon we forget what happened on 9/11. The thought of even 1 person getting through with something will be regretted. There is a need for more high tech security because the terrorist are trying more high tech ways to hurt us. I am for whatever it takes to protect us.
Posted By bob on November 18, 2010, 10:26 AM

(Comment on Newsweek.com)

However, opponents of the new x-ray technology claim it’s illegal and violates basic human rights. Travelers like Deb Green and Erin Watson disagree.

“I just think they have to do what they have to do and for security for the airport. So, whatever it takes, I’m cool with,” Green said.

(MyFoxMemphis.com)

Earlier in the day, passenger Heidi Rotheim faced a minimal wait time at security. Despite some skepticism, Rotheim said she wouldn’t “opt out” of a body scan in favor of a pat-down search.

“Well, I’m a cancer survivor, so I’m a little nervous of all these perpetual scans, but I’m gonna choose to take the easier route and go through the scans,” she said. “As long as their practices are effective, which we all question, whatever it takes to be safe.”

(SCPR.org)

Indeed, a new pole shows that 48 percent of Americans see the new pat-downs as justified, while 50 percent say they go too far. When it comes to security and safety 45,000 miles above the earth, I’m fine with whatever it takes to make sure some holy Jihadist doesn’t have the opportunity to blow me out of the sky.

(Daniel L., ChelseaNewsRoom)

We must do whatever it takes to keep our nation safe for everyone. Profiling is just another fact of life that we as a nation must accept.

(“John P.,” commenting on blogs.abcnews.com)

Ms. Malkoff, Ms. Carnes, “bob,” Ms. Green, Ms. Rotheim, Daniel L, John P.:

You are fit only to be subjects, not citizens of a republic. May posterity forget that you were our countrymen.

Our nation will never be safe for everyone. Even today, a terrorist could shove a bomb up his butt, walk through security, and blow a plane out of the sky. Even now, “whatever it takes” includes cavity searches. If you would join me in saying, “no further,” flying halfway around the world would still be safer than driving 200 miles on the freeway.

TSA cannot keep you safe. TSA did not stop the shoe bomber or the underwear bomber. Scope-or-grope would probably not have caught the underwear bomber. TSA has never caught a terrorist (if they had, you can bet that the organization that releases screening-area video in response to criticism would have trumpeted the fact). Your reliance on the government to keep you safe is false.

What’s more, by allowing the government to do “whatever [it claims] it takes,” you are complicit in terrorism.

The goal of terrorism is not to cause death or property damage. The goal of terrorism is by using or threatening violence to cause fear, and by causing fear to change behavior. If we refuse to be afraid, or if, being afraid, we defiantly refuse to change our behavior, the terrorists lose. Let them blow themselves to Hell, as long as future generations still know liberty.

Some say that the terrorists hate us for our freedom; this is at best a gross oversimplification. But our freedom is an integral part of who we are as a people. The terrorists can no more take away our freedom than they can kill every one of us; only by causing us to give up our freedom can the terrorists destroy who we are.

Who is the enemy in the war on terror, ladies and gentlemen? Look in the mirrror.

2 Comments

  1. Once got a full-on body check at Shanghai Airport, on way back from a legal conference. Full frisk; first thing in the morning, by a (babe) female security guard (seriously), nobody else present. Enjoyed being violated by PRC. No complaints. Unfortunately, didn’t touch my junk. But buy into your arguments if done by a bloke.

    But, seriously, we’re getting this nonsense visiting clients in our (American-owned) private prisons now. Not touching our junk as such. But getting there. Why negotiate airport security to see a client in the big house? It’s only the private prisons that want us to take our shoes off. What’s your take on the level of degradation to see our clients? What do you have to do?

  2. Hear, hear! Now if only the airport and other county courthouses will accept my Bexar County-walk-around-the-metal-detector ID badge. These stupid policies just reinforce my drive-don’t-fly policy whenever I go out of town to represent a client. Like tomorrow, I have to be in court in Harris County–I’m going to get up at 3am and drive so I can be in court by 8:30. I will only fly if I have no other option. I haven’t flown since 2005 and I don’t miss it one bit.

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